Changing your air filter should be a familiar and comfortable process; if it’s not, you’ve come to the right place. It’s inexpensive, easy and can play a big role in vehicle performance. You are probably wondering, “But how will I know when to change the filter? I’m no mechanic!” Well bewildered reader, a good rule of thumb is once or twice a year, or roughly every 12,000 miles. But keep in mind that your environment can affect this. Obviously daily dirt road driving will require you to replace your filter more often than Sunday driving in the city.

   If nothing else, learn to change your own air filter. It’s so easy and saves you money.

   Can you remember your last visit to Jiffy Lube for an oil change? These guys always hit you up with the patented, “You really need a new air filter” line. And you’re left wondering, “Do I really need a new one? What should I do? Can I really trust this guy?” If in your shock, you utter “Ok,” the mechanic then adds another set of fees for labor, parts, and a new air filter, whose brand is usually a mystery.

    Now you can stick it to the man and simply say, “No thanks, I will do it myself.” That is if, in fact, it really needs to be done.





















You will need very few tools for this procedure. If possible grab two medium-sized screwdrivers, one Philips and one standard.

The air filter is typically enclosed in a black plastic casing near the top of the engine. In larger vehicles, it may be off to the side. It is usually the largest non-metal assembly you see; approximately the size of a bread box.

Most air boxes are held together by a couple of large metal clips on the side. Either pop off the clips or slide the flat-head screwdriver between the casing and the clip and pry the clip off. Occasionally you will find the top is held down by several long screws, in which case you simply unscrew them to access the filter.

Pop the air box top off and expose the secrets of the all mighty air box. Basically, you will find the air filter—riveting, I know. It’s usually bright yellow or orange or red, to better see collected dirt.

Pull it out. It’s typically one foot by six inches and has rubber edges along the bottom.

To check for cleanliness, hold it up and bend it back, so the paper ridges of the filter flutter like pages in a book. Now look in the crevices and look at all the dirt and grime it stopped from entering your engine. Pretty cool, huh? Hold the filter at arms length and look at it straight on. If the colored paper is mostly dirty in the center than it is time to replace it. Guess how much this will cost you-- About $5; a lot less than Jiffy Lube.

You can throw the old filter in a plastic bag and bring it to your local auto part store to make sure you get the right replacement. Or you can save time by ordering a new one online. You can now stand proud and confidently say, “I know how to check and replace my air filter.” And damn it feels good.

From K&N to Volant filters, you really can’t go wrong with any name brand air filter. You may also want to consider upgrading to a Volant cold air intake for added sound and performance. –Mike Rosania

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mike_Rosania

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How To Replace Your Dirty Air Filter
By Mike Rosania
Replace Your Air Filter
   It’s time to get down and dirty. Park your car in a shaded area and let it cool for a few minutes—you don’t want to be working with a steaming engine that can potentially burn you; i.e. don’t change your filter after a six hour road trip.
Air Filters

  Are K&N filters worth it?
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